Teaching: Marriage and Family Therapy

This page documents my work in the Marriage and Family Therapy masters degree program at Pfeiffer University Fall 2016 through Fall 2020.

Spring 2019MMFT 602: Theories
Fall 2018MMFT 603: Theory & Practice of Group Therapy
Summer 2017
Summer 2018
Summer 2019
Summer 2020
MMFT 605: Addiction in the Family System
Fall 2020MMFT 685: Advanced Trauma Assessment
Marriage and Family Therapy courses taught

MMFT 602: Family Therapy Theories

A survey of contemporary, multicultural, and contextual analyses of the major models of marriage and family therapy, the integration of various approaches in relationship therapy, and the research outcomes which document the state of MFT effectiveness.

I joined this course after mid-term to complete the semester after a faculty member left the university.

MMFT 603: Group Theories and Practice

This course is designed to provide students with theoretical understanding and training in the use of groups in clinical and educational settings. Included will be an application of effective psychotherapy skills and procedures to help prepare students to work with children, youth, and adults in a systemic context. Additionally, students will participate in an ongoing experiential process group throughout the semester.

I built this course using the syllabus provided by the department. I updated that syllabus and created the educational content for this in-person course. This course is also taught by on the RDU campus each Summer, so course content is designed to match.

The groups course includes a practice segment. To prevent the instructor from potentially learning personal information about students and to allow students to interact in the group experience external group leaders are brought in to support the exercise. The instructor of record for this course is responsible for the hiring and supervision of the group facilitators.

MMFT 605: Addictions in Family Systems

This course examines the various models and systemic views of addiction and treatment. Use disorders are identified as well as its impact on individuals, couples, and families. Specific attention to a systems perspective and various therapeutic approaches for the treatment of chemical dependency and substance use disorders will serve as a critical guide to assessment and intervention efforts.

I built this course using the syllabus provided by the department. I updated that syllabus and created the educational content for this in-person course. This course is also taught by on the RDU campus each Summer, so course content is designed to match. In Summer 2020 this course was taught synchronously online, allowing students from both sister MMFT programs to attend.

The major innovations I developed for this course include the introduction of live mock counseling practice triads as students support each other throughout a substance abstinence period and the introduction of autoethnography as the major research paper. This course introduces the lived experiences of substance-affected persons and systems from a trauma-informed and non-12-Step perspective.

MMFT 685: Advanced Trauma Assessment

This course is intended for advanced students pursuing studies in psychology, criminal justice, counselor education, and the human services and mental health professions.  This experientially focused course will address basic skills and strategies of trauma assessment and intervention including empirically supported models for the treatment of trauma. Basic model information taught may include Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), Eye- Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Traumatic Incident Reduction Therapy (TIR), Internal Family Systems (IFS), among others.  This course will also address the assessment and treatment of trauma utilizing a systemic lens.  Skills developed will also include the application of practical helping techniques.  Special topics may include, but are not limited to, normal assessment of trauma and related symptomatology, neuroscience of trauma, domestic violence, natural disaster stress and community-based trauma, violence in the schools and in the work place, post- traumatic therapy and recovery, and compassion fatigue.

I built this course using the syllabus provided by the department. I updated that syllabus and created the educational content for this hybrid/flex course. This course is also taught by on the RDU campus each Summer, so course content is designed to match.

The major innovations I developed for this course include incorporating topics on the cutting-edge in counselor education. We began the semester with a discussion of Race-Based Traumatic Stress and Historical Trauma. We will end the course with a discussion of trauma-informed systems of care.